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of the president promised once more to develop the energy sources of the future. win any administration republican or democrat develops energy projects taxpayers better watch out. governments pick winners and losers that leads to wasted taxpayer dollars. this it is the question of industrial policy with the government should support business ventures that are unable to secure private funding. government appears to be worse than the private markets. in contrast in a speech in california in may, and it romney's said "the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green p
drinks to avoid f.d.a. oversight. we've called on the agency to regulate energy drinks that have caffeine levels well above the 71 milligrams per 12-ounce threshold in soft drinks. today senator blumenthal and i asked the f.d.a. commissioner to meet with us to personally meet with us after thanksgiving to discuss the steps the f.d.a. is taking to ensure the safety of energy drinks. every other week we're seeing mounting evidence that energy drinks pose safety risks. you learn about young people hospitalized or seriously hurt after consuming what are marketed as little energy pick pick-me-ups. we look forward to working with commissioner hamburg to protect our children and to protect everyone in america from these die tear supplements, whether it is 5-hour energy or the monster energy drink which led to the death of this 14-year-old girl in maryland. mr. president, it's been many years since came to this floor and argued about dietary supplements. we all know what's involved here. i always preface my remarks by saying when i got up this morning i took my vitamin, i took my fish oi
-cost energy supplies, that can have a dramatic impact on what we might see in terms of being able to proceed with a manufacturing, um, and manufacturing continuation of employment here that is not just dependent on what we hold sacrosanct which is our, you know, our innovation, our high-tech and service industries which we should very much be supporting. but at the end of the day, we want to have a balanced economy as well, and i think that's something to work on. >> i'm glad you mentioned, heidi, because i was getting very depressed talking about the hollowing out of the middle class. i think it's the single biggest issue if america today and hard -- in america today and hard to see a clear answer, but maybe energy is going to be part of the solution. steve, do you agree? >> i do agree, and i wish i had thought to include that. slightly more on optimistic, because heidi is completely right. it is a great thing that is happening to us in terms of availability of particularly low-cost natural gas. it's not a worldwide commodity which means if you have as much of it as we have at the moment, t
of this event which were very grateful for, and i think it's symbolic of incredible new energy that is developing in detroit and i should also say that josh created a company called, in 1999 here in detroit, operating all this time. two weeks ago it sold for a nice exit. here's a story of a company, a local copy that came from here, when all the way and he's an real well with the. even vested in a ton of other companies. so i just want to start asking you, steve, you know, when i told you about this you like it neatly, you want to be a part of the trick why do you think techonomy detroit was a good idea? >> i didn't think it was good at that is a great idea. i appreciate that you're willing to do this and shine a spotlight on detroit because to me it is not just about detroit commission of the story of aqaba notion in america and how it really is spread more broadly through the nation than we sometimes relate. silicon valley is the epicenter of enormous innovation, tremendous companies there, exciting, something we're all proud of. but there's also a lot of companies all across
the development of an energy surplus because of technological advances in exploiting both oil and natural gas resources, combined with new energy efficiency measures that will greatly reduce u.s. energy use. now, the u.s. has now predicted the international energy agency predicts the u.s. will be the number one producer of oil by 2020. it will also be probably close to the top of producers of natural gas. this will give us the wealth and income michael lind mentioned 1.5% of gdp. we need over the next what is it, 15 or 20 years to make up the shortfall in social security and 45% in medicare. well, the explosion moving from an energy deficit to an energy surplus will more than half close that gdp gap. so, we have an economic conditions that suggests that the challenges we face are the exact opposite of what the bowles-simpson grand bargain would impose on us as a growth strategy. the conditions that we're going to face over the next five to eight years, with some in the ration if we do the right things, are an ongoing shortfall both domestic and global demand, excess capital and labor, and exc
-olds can do and does not invest much in training but certainly in 2001 did not invest much energy into training so for example an army in the military intelligence schools would get three days of training in the interrogation techniques, so frankly much of our interrogation wasn't competent. it had to be held in the contractors who carried in quality. the fbi had a skull the interrogators from the high value detainee's that came from higher levels special allegiance but for the most part this was caught flatfooted and they were prepared to do large-scale. we have slowly tried to improve that. to the obama's administration credit he said the high value detainee interrogation group which is an agency group which sends out interrogators' every time a high value is teaching and there is a research unit that stood out to study best practices and spend them out into the training academies thus training practices about interrogation and that's been up and running for a few years and has already -- i know improved training techniques to respect michael skerker is a professor of the u.s. n
, and the truth is, they are brutal. look at what's happening in the iranian energy area. it's not only the fact that they are able to sell, you know, less than 50% of what they were selling before, but their production, output down to 2.6 million barrels a day, and part of the reason for that is because of the sanctions, the inability to continue to invest in their energy infrastructure, the inability to continue to pump and store oil as they shut down oil fields, may not be easy for them to recoop. look at what's happening to the currency, devaluation, and there's estimates that the currency's devalued by half every two months. think about what that means. that means what you are buying, and when you go and buy something, cost twices as much, and what you have in the bank is worth half as much. this is bound to affect the society as a whole, and, again, look at what the supreme leader said. on more than one occasion, explicitly called for officials to stop fighting each other, and that's not the first time that's happened, but it's interesting when you look at what some of the criticisms are.
and what we might see in the coming decades with abundant cost of energy supplies that could have a dramatic impact on what we might see in terms of being able to proceed with a manufacturing growth in manufacturing continuation of employment here that is not independent on the innovation or high-tech industries which we should very much be supporting. that's something to keep an eye on. >> i'm glad you mentioned energy because i was getting very depressed talking about the middle class i think it is the single biggest issue in america today. will be part of the energy solution. >> i wish that i had included that because heidi is completely right. it is a great thing that is happening in terms of the availability in the natural gas where as you know it isn't a well liked commodity where it's produced which means if you have as much of it as we have at the moment, the price is low relative to the cost of oil and therefore we can attract energy intensive manufacturing in north dakota and eastern ohio to wherever to take advantage of it and that is a great thing and i don't want to m
will drive calf too, that's where the energy needs to be put. that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in the business because, remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coi understand didn'tly. -- coincidentally. we got out of sync, one down efficiently and fast. we just have to work the usf thing, and it's about the consumer. >> host: jeff gardner, president and ceo of the windstream corporation. he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you.Ñsr >> next, the interim america dialogue discusses the results of the november 6th elections and implications for latin america. panelists discuss the prospects for change with the obama add enrings' policies involving immigration, trade, drug policy, and economic cooperation. this is about an hour and ten minutes. >> this morning, we're going to have a conversation
but continuing with the theme of abundance, we will see the development of an energy surplus because of technological advances in exploiting both oil and natural gas resources, combined with new energy efficiency measures that will greatly reduce u.s. energy use. now the u.s. is now predicted, the international energy agency, predicts the u.s. will be the, will be the number one producer of oil by 2020. it will also be probably close to the top in the producers of natural gas. this will give us the wealth and income, mike lindh mentioned -- lind, mentioned 1 1/2% of gdp, we have 16 to 20 years to make up for the short fall in, in social security and 4 to 5% in medicare. well, the explosion of a moving from a energy deficit to a energy surplus will more than half close that gdp gap. so, we have a economic conditions that suggest that the challenges we face are the exact opposite of what the bowles-simpson grand bargain would impose on us as a growth strategy. the conditions that we're going to face over the next five to eight years with some amelioration if we do the right things are
energy was spent on health care and other things coming into the question is do you see that -- how do you strike that balance and do you see that changing as you go forward into the next four years? >> to complicate your questions about what the balance in the short term and the immediate and long-term things that matter for the strength of the economy and i think it's important to recognize that as we get to the next phase of the fiscal reform debate you have to think about this not just about how you bring them down gradually to the point they are sustainable you to think about it in terms of what can you do to improve the long-term growth in the american economy? there are things we have to do in infrastructure and education just to name to that are important to the potential of the country and are not very expensive. if we sacrifice those objectives in the interest of getting more fiscal restraint more quickly than is desirable would do damage across the country, so i would just encourage people to look at -- we want to look at things that are good for growth now and over the long
for the public, and you manage to get rules in place like the federal energy regulatory commission has done, to basically say you can't challenge anything we do, there's a fight going on right now where they dismiss without any discussion challenges to their practices and pipelines out there they regulate earning over 50% annual profit and they've given them a 38% rate increase over five years. what you do is you get this rate increase and then if there's nobody watching, it becomes a permanent rate increase, so the executives today get to report higher profits than they were really earning and therefore more money from their stock options and in the future, those executives will do just fine because they'll get more money, and who loses? the customers. >> host: do the public outcries that happen after these mass blackouts make a difference? or is it they pay a lot of attention and give lip service -- >> guest: i don't think so. i think this is a real fundamental problem. the utility board are really insulated. >>> when i first wrote about the public utilities in the early 18970s, the utili
, but certainly they do not invest much energy into trading. for example, an army recruit who goes to military intelligence school would get three days of training in interrogation techniques, only three days. so frankly, much of our interrogation was not competent. it had to be farmed out to contractors his varied in quality. the fbi had some skilled interrogators and some of the best intelligence we got from high-value detainees came from high-level special agents and the fbi. but for the most part this nation was caught flatfooted, well-prepared to do large-scale interrogations', and we have slowly, slowly tried to improve that. i think to the obama administration's credit when he came into office to set up something called the high
by people from the utility industry, a lawyer from the cell phone industry, a finance your from the energy industry coming in by quote the editor of a little paper in california the only peter besides the l.a. times that's been tough on the utility industry whose says it doesn't stand for public utility commission because they are so unpopular he calls of the profit up keep commission. >> host: there are other examples of interesting to me but there's a section on the 401k and the retirement savings what do you find is there a lesson that we can do as individuals if everybody knew how to invest well then they would pay the wages and for all of my education and knowledge i don't know how to do that i just spend less than you make. the efficient way to take care of people's old wage there is not peacekeeping is through defined benefit pension plans and you hear the industry saying let's get rid of these they aren't predictable. that's nonsense you can buy the pension plan call-up any insurance plan and say i'm this age here is how much i have and tell them your gender and get a blood test an
be innovative in our thinking and maintaining energy. we must always put people above. we must work hard and preserve the integrity. these characteristics hold great promise for the future and a success intends is contingent of young people, the whole party should care about our young people and learn about what they have in mind and encourage their growth and support them. young people should respond to the parties outlook on life and sense of values and always cherish our country and our great nation. [speaking in native tongue] let the youthful vigor shine with radiant vibrance. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: the success of chinese characteristics cannot be achieved without a concerted effort of the chinese nation. our common course depends on unity. all party members must ensure unity and must pursue the unity of the whole party and the unity of all ethnic groups in china including promoting great unity of the peoples of other countries. we should complete a moderately prosperous society to win a new victory for socialism and make strong efforts create an even
that are important for queer communities -- the energy that we are putting around marriage equality issue. >> this is an important question. issues of employment discrimination are critically important. even things like health care disparity, if you will, the reality of where lbgt people are, it is not quite clear and it doesn't bubble up to what is being talked about right now. because marriage equality had been at the forefront. and i do think in some ways, it is why the national gays and lesbians have spent so much time trying to broaden this to make sure that transgendered people in those issues are included in all the work that we do. it is widely thought very hard to make sure that gender identity is included in the employment nondiscrimination act. because we could go the other way with incremental progress with his progress. but we would've left out a whole swath of the community. folks who have greater experiences of discrimination, violence is still an issue. we forget that people are still being violently attacked because of who they are and because of who they love. i think a
in this moment, very unsustainable. must make fiscal reform and energy reform, education reform. but anyway, second. in this moment i don't know whether this will mean that's been in this moment i consider the bailout is not critical for the country. >> why not? >> one, because the condition they can establish after you ask the bailout may be will be the same policies that the government trying to intimate in spain. an advantage in terms of finance countries, of credit, but i believe you have limited -- [inaudible] and this is a price, a medical term, maybe economic terms will be in my view would be my view, more than -- [inaudible]. the second, but the bailout we're talking about bailout not in the greater terms. bailout not depend only of the will of the spanish government. depend on the approval of the rest of the government's. >> particularly germany, right? >> because it is the most important country. but i am convinced the germans reject any totally the possibility spend go ask you don't spank you think germany will veto any bailout for spring? >> absolute. i am convinced of this. so
in a pot of time and energy and talent was spent on this campaign. there is voters across america that took as much as six hours to stand in line to vote. the same house majority leader. so what is that going to mean as it moves forward here in washington? >> i'm going to go back again. as i ended, the fact we have the same majority leader, senate, and i'm very glad we do. harry reid is a great leader. the fact he's still the majority leader doesn't mean there hasn't been a change. there has in fact been a significant change in the makeup of who people are as about their life experience. it's about what they bring to the table. the fact is in the state of new hampshire, for example, we have a woman governor, two women senators, when democrat and one republican and we now have two women democratic numbers of congress. they are in many ways. we also know they shall not pass the first vote and maybe they're going to be a pioneer in this kind of representation. i'm going to go back for a moment, by the way, jennifer. after thinking about this from i realized when i hear maggie hasan talk out wh
and the truth is, they are brutal. you look what is happening in the iranian energy area, not only the fact that they're able to sell, you know, less than 50% of what they were selling before. it is that their production, their output is down from over 4 million barrels a day to 2.6 million barrels a day. part of the reason for that is precisely because of the sanctions, the inability to continue to invest in the energy infrastructure, the inability to continue to pump and store oil as they shut down oil fields that may not be so easy for them to recoup. you look what is happening to the currency, the devaluation. there are some estimates that the currency is being devalued by half every two months. think about what that means. it means that what you're buying, when you go and you buy something it costs you twice as much. it means what you have in the bank is worth half as much. if this is continuing to happen, it is bound to have an effect on the society as a whole whole. look at what the supreme leader has been saying over the last couple weeks. on more than one occasion he has explicitly
nonearmarker now is staying put at the appropriations level. fred upton, who's the chairman of the energy and commerce committee where a lot of health care and a lot of energy policy goes through, the committee of jurisdiction there, is going to be staying for another two years. and ways and means, which might see a lot of action with fiscal cliff, with tax reform, any kind of entitlement stuff also goes thruways and means, dave camp, another michigander is not going anywhere either. the judiciary committee which is headed by lamar smith right now, he's term limited, he's going to make a bid for the science committee. and he will find himself in competition with james sensenbrenner who has indicated he is interest inside that job as well. ralph hall, who's the republican -- who's the chairman now is term limited. also the transportation and infrastructure committee which is now headed by john mica, and mica is term limited in that role, and there are a few people who have seniority, but they either have committee assignments or are not looked upon as viable. it looks as though we are pass
to the committee on energy with instructions to report back the following amendment, number 2880. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that motion. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. reid: i have an amendment to the instructions. that's also at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposes amendment numbered 2881 to the instructions on the motion to commit s. 3525. mr. reid: i ask for the yeas and nays on that amendment. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the yeas and nays are ordered. mr. reid: i have a second-degree amendment at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from nevada, mr. reid, proposes amendment numbered 2882 to amendment numbered 2881. mr. reid: i have a cloture motion on the bill that is already at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: cloture motion. we, the undersigned senators in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the st
and take your, take your energy? that is -- information. that is example of unfairness. we brought 100 examples of spam cases many based on unfairness. 40 data security cases using unfairness. those are examples where i think you want us to use this statute. this is a statute that congress gave us in 1939 to prohibit unfair deceptive acts or practices. >> wyndham case is fair example. it didn't protect their credit card data. >> what we allege, yes. >> 500,000 credit card numbers ended up in the hands of a russian company. >> can neither confirm or deny that. that is certainly the allegation. i don't think even they deny it. >> i guess you brought that. >> involving multiple hacks. not first time or second time. perhaps as many as three. >> one thing i wonder about, one criticism of the ftc you didn't do anything to google for their overcollection of wi-fi information and i don't know how much you can say about that by that, part of the problem there was they didn't say they wouldn't do it. so it wasn't deceptive. they never said i'm not going to collect everybody's information over wi
a basis and it may be under the rubric of energy. there is a lot of what obama wants to do on energy, trust climate change in the process and so it may be in a more pragmatic in the context of this crisis, that there will be movement. could be movement. >> this question is for a map. matt, as we see the latino population getting bigger, more affluent, more politically involved and also the courage role -- cultural base that they are normally family, open the gates up for everyone as long as they'll have an equal opportunity. if there is a legitimate latino candidate in the future, the reciprocal, will they be able to coalesce with the african-american vote just as president obama has taken the coalition of latinos and african-americans, would a hispanic be able to do the same thing? >> i think so. i think that there is a lot of similarities. if you look at a lot of the congressional candidates that are out there and now as we now represent districts that are both black and latino, they are doing that our reach and finding there are some similarities in these communities. we do someti
person at a time. >> it makes me think that the whole media energy around this book, the last time there was this kind of media energy was when it went down. we are going back to those places, they were making those accusations, the speed at which that happened, how do you feel being back in that space and having the whole story? >> it feels good to know that i was able to use the same media in a sense to get the story, the right story of. i can't explain how great it feels to be able to sit here and -- i don't know if you saw on the. i was crying. it amazing, and i made the decision years ago that i didn't want people to forget my father and what he meant to us. i had no idea i would not be able to tell the story in this way. it feels great. >> what is so beautiful about this book is i feel it is more than a book. is a living history. like a love lesson to choices and it reminds us foie that without the feelings, the facts don't convey enough. that is a brutal as the history of african-american struggle for humanity and rights have been, they have been humanity and love and family
they need to be remediated. traditionally you would separate energy retail kids you're smart and you tell these kids you are not, not as smart. what we are seeing, when you keep them together, they've mentorship from each other and the teacher, many times it's quite hard to predict, it's very hard, some of the students were falling behind and maybe in algebra, and some of them didn't know multiplication. some of them did not know how to add fraction. he given the opportunity to build the foundation and then these kids racing. so the problem wasn't that some cognitive inability to understand algebra. the problems they are sitting in algebra class and for some reason they didn't understand how to multiply or add fraction. you are just feel silly in algebra class and you'll disengage really just to protect your own self-esteem. so i'm actually now more and more convinced that pretty much everyone, you know, barring certain exception, we don't know where congresswoman, we don't know but progress far it. we're seeing in these classrooms, we traditionally think motivated kids are maybe 20% kids
, afghanistan/pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. so starting with that, looking at it strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? um, if not, what would you change, what would you add? >> i -- when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs councils went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues, and congratulations to you. i think you have them just right. i think there is an overarching issue on top of all of them that in some sense effects and enables all of them x that is if you look at at the national security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic
with the fire wall strategy spending about half of the convention dollars in energy. the three fire walls deutsch of florida, ohio and virginia which aside from indiana and north carolina is more appointed to victories of 2008 were the lowest percentage stays for barack obama. they have to those states together have 60 electoral votes they would appear to have to be entered 32 electoral votes without them he would have 272 which would meet only one other state would have tipped. there is not a likely candidate as you look down the percentages in this election. but it was nonetheless close. and i think it is this proved to be effective if you carry committees currently carrying florida by 46,000 votes and by 107,000 virginia by 100,000. the two injured 53,000 votes margins are responsible for his big electoral vote margin. it is a classic example of a high-risk strategy. the obama strategist are now going to be healed with some appropriateness as berlin and for employing the strategy. if a few numbers turn out a little differently they might be excoriated, but the fact is that they succeed
capital is a big drag, but on the other hand, there's energy prices low. you've got a low relatively -- natural gas, you got housing, having apparently hit bottom, starting to turn, so there's a variety of things. there's a lot of money on the sidelines. >> you raised china. talk about china for a second. the united states, europe, japan, latin america, asia excluding china, every one of those regions experienced a financial and economic crisis in the last 20 years. china stands out as not having gone through such turmoil. can they continue? can they keep that up? is china the next country that we have to worry about for some kind of economic upheaval? >> i'll start. well, the short term, i think what's important for people to understand this year with the political transition is the chinese leadership has a real fear of inflation, and this goes back to 89. they were going o error on the side of being careful with food prices, higher inflation. now that they are threw that, what you start to see if they've got the resources to be able to avoid a hard landing, but the critical questio
of energy and the law time on your hands, we have a school in the community, we will teach you how to make a difference and how to make this park safer, not just to clean up the park but you need to have a partnership with the police and maybe you will need to change some what about assembly and how late you are going to be there and get support from neighbors, the house of midnight basketball games or whatever it is and improving the community and making schools seem like a more relevant place. >> there are a couple seems in your book where the principle that reagan high school literally kind of does that, calls in the student, student leadership, people she thinks have invested themselves personally in the school and says what do we need to do? she has the right this will turn around grant. and i thought your treatment of that science teacher was well done because you never talked about the boundaries, you just illustrated them. where did you come away from that experience? >> it was an interesting reporting challenge. i didn't expect it to be such a big part of the book. or such a big p
and stay married as much as possible, barring death, make divorce difficult, focus people's sexual energies in only one direction, marriage. and in that way, women, men and children would end up being happier and better protected. i ended up--and that quote you mentioned about single men is from a section on whether marriage is good for men. the answer is that by practically any objective measurement today, married men are happier, better off, have fewer accidents, fewer pathologies, etc. , than single men. and the same thing--similar patterns can be observed for women and in terms of the benefits of marriage. c-span: when you speak of the founders, name the ones that are the most important to you. >> guest: well, i mean--by the founders, i just mean those americans who were prominent in the writing of the fundamental documents that governed the nation in the founding era. the top people obviously would be thomas jefferson, john adams, washington, hamilton. those would probably be the top four. c-span: what were their relationships with women? >> guest: well, jefferson is probably the one w
the energy industry coming in by quote the editor of a little paper in california, the only people in california besides the l.a. times that's been tough on the bulletin who says the eeoc doesn't stand for public utility commission because they are in the industry he calls it the profit upkeep commission. >> host: some of the rhetoric samples interesting to me, the section on the 401k and retirement, what do you find that you would like to talk about briefly but also is there a lesson we could do as individuals? >> guest: if everybody knew how to invest money the average job would pay wages and it's absurd. for all of my education and knowledge of the chicago school and not an economist and i've written about finance i'm not a good investor i just don't spend less than you make. but efficient way to take care of people's old age which there is no use gaping is through defined benefit pension plans and year the industry say we have to get rid of these they are not predictable. you can buy in individually defined pension plan called the insurance company and say i am this age i want
for this country. and i think when you get a situation where people have been spending most of their energy and time focused on their ill health or the ramifications of that with family members, there is not much space for doing the things we would like to see. so we have great ideas, wonderful examples of governance, education and so forth that we have seen and would like to spread, people don't have time for it. can focus on it. the vacancy, the vacuum created by that basic security invites trouble and in my experience this is where problems are. as i look around the world, there are a few areas that are well-educated and well defined and troubled, but vast areas that are troublesome that are all marked by lack of stability and so forth. these tieback pretty directly. it is a big world, a lot of different situations. >> the gentleman in the front and then we will get the uniform in the back. right here. >> i am ed vermont from the national institute of disease, and before that, i am a retired officer and i was actually recruited to and i age because of my military background. in 12 years
of opportunity which we won't have for three years after that. we could have tax reform and we could have energy legislation. but we haven't even had a defense bill or cybersecurity. joe lieberman is still trying to get a cybersecurity bill, which is really important in this country. but the president -- he is our leader. he needs to engage more than we have somebody here in the room that can talk to him. i am an incurable optimist. >> i share trent's optimism. we can't adopt the total bipartisan balanced budget agreement, but we can get started. we can have a real down payment, elise to cover the first year of what otherwise would be this cluster, which is $110 billion. and i think we can do some tax reform and some entitlement reform and pull it together. and then we can adopt a process that tries to push committees of the regular order to come out with enough savings and spending and enough new revenue as part of tax reform and long-term entitlement reform -- were not thought possible to do this and this lame-duck session -- one quick point. i usually watch fox news sunday, but i sometimes wa
on energy and commerce. trust but verify. we are not trusting today as you can tell from a line of questioning. and we shouldn't be. that judge in the previous panel talk about contribution to society in the great state of tennessee and his life was lost, but a vicious one how many? were talking about far too many people. so i was just in my last second asked you, dr. hamburg and maybe dr. smith to comment as well, do you think that the fda needs because of this develops a sudden high price change the law so that you are ever succeeds you have says broad authority over the compounding pharmacies across the country who are doing the right thing. they're not manufacturing drugs. they're just trying to provide a service based on a prescription that has to be written. this company was an absolute cricket operation and they kill people. i don't think anybody should get confused between them and the typical compound pharmacy in drugstores across our districts. >> we need a tiered approach in terms of the legislation. i think that clearly the traditional compound or working locally is
-kneed. the naysayers and what not. but rather those with restless energy, buoyant optimism and large faith in themselves in particular and this is the entrepreneurial type. and, these are exactly the characteristics which allowed the entrepreneurs to achieve great things and also to go broke. this is, this great "in tom's book about the long history of successes is the precursor to a failure. think of what the successful entrepreneur has learned. he has learned that when i have all of these helpers around telling me i can do this, it's too risky and it will never work, and i i do it anyway and i succeed, so how does he look at all these advisers in the entrepreneurs eyes who ought to tell him next time, you can do it. i mean we have to ask ourselves what happens to minsky's dialectic or balance between the entrepreneur and the banker, which i think it's such a nice way to think about this, when the entrepreneurs take over the banks? and this is the point. when this entrepreneurial type takes over the bank, that is supposed to be the risk-averse, cynical worried about risk type, what do you
underutilization of capital i equipment. the one issue we need to face is resource costs and energy prices. that is not a question which is being driven by overuse at the moment, it's being driven by other factors. i'm not as optimistic as stephanie is about the long-term potential path, but is there a trade-off between what we should do to protect our elderly population and to provide adequate medical care to the whole poppation and what we should do to reconstruct our infrastructure and address energy and climate issues? no. we are underperforming on both fronts. >> but there's a -- it's not a budget tear trade-off, it's -- budgetary trade-off, as long as we think revenues can only be this high, then there's a fight among those priorities. we have to accept having higher revenues to pay for the things we want. that softens that trade-off. the entitlements are not, are not a drain on real resources, they're a transfer. but there is a question of public sector investment versus what's going on in the private sector. when we're at full capacity, we have that trade-off. but the issue is, um,
. and touched on it as others. $6 billion is spent in time, energy and talent spent on this can pain. voters across america take as much a six-hour susana nights ago. at the end of this, with the same president compassing house majority leader and the same senate leader. what is that going to mean in terms of policy as it moves forward here washington? >> i'm going to go back again. as i handed him the the fact we've had the same majority leader, i'm very glad we do. harry reid is a great leader. but the fact is still the majority leader does not mean there hasn't been a change. the make of those who people are is about the life experience. it's about what they bring to the table. the fact that the state of new hampshire, for example, we now have a woman governor. with two women senators, when democrat among the public republican coming out how to win a democratic members of congress. new hampshire is a pioneer in our politics in many ways, but we all know they will not cast the first vote and maybe they're going to be a pioneer in this kind of representation. i want to go back for a moment,
of preconvention dollars and energy on a free firewall states, florida, ohio and virginia. where the lowest percentage of states for barack obama. they have, though states together have 60 electoral votes. they were important. with him, obama would. a 332 electoral votes. without them he would have 272 which would mean only one other state would have tipped. there's not a likely candidate as you look down the percentages in this election, but it was nonetheless close. and i think this proved to be effective. he carried them he is currently carried florida by 46,000 votes, ohio by 107,000, and virginia by 100,000. those 253,000 vote margin are responsible for his big electoral vote margin. it's a classic example of a high risk strategy. the obama strategists are now going to be hailed with some appropriateness as brilliant for employing this strategy. faq numbers it turned out a little differently they might be excoriated, but the fact is that they succeeded. and i think when you compare movement of the target states and non-target states, if you look at a target states, colorado, florida, i
of their energy and time focused on their ill health, where the ramifications of that were family members, there's just not much space for doing the things we'd like to see. so we have great ideas, wonderful examples of governments and education and so forth that we have seen and would like to spread. people don't have time for them, can't focus on it. and the vacancy -- the vacuum created by that basic security invites trouble. in my experience, this is where problems are. as i look around the world, there are a few areas that are well educated and well defined, but there are vast areas that troubles some, that are hallmarks by lack of stability and security and so forth. so i think in my mind, decent dvd. not every case because it's a good quote. lots of different situations, but that's when. the chama manufacturing front and that will get the uniform in the back there. right here, sir. >> i am from the national institute of allergy and disease at nah. before that i was on the army retired medical blog. i was actually recruited to nih because they military background because 12 years ago, the
after the election. so thank you very much, sir. >> coming up tonight, a house energy and commerce subcommittee hears testimony on the fungal meningitis outbreak linked to a massachusetts company. the defense department and holds a briefing on actions taken after an investigation into misconduct. at laflin air force base in san antonio. that is followed by an interview with outgoing house services member, congressman barney frank. today's of nonfiction books this weekend. your calls, e-mails, and tweets. many featured authors including jake tapper and christopher hitchens book, mortality. live coverage starts on saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. eastern on sunday at noon on c-span2's booktv. join us online
compromise on the debt to the knife the comprehensive energy policy so i am much more optimistic. you mention hubert humphrey and i have my doubts. >> the president has just given a press conference sounding feisty on the issue of taxes. he seemed to be saying he was given a mandate by the american people not to continue with tax cuts. with mitt romney in this campaign will that hold up with the budget negotiations? >> i want to bring the debt down. people making over to reduce $50,000 per year would be taxed at the bush level then at the clinton level it saves about $700 billion. that is why we're so interested in that proposal. i see it is the way to bring in the money. one way is spending cuts and it has to be a shared sacrifice. if it was a small amount of money or just about the election it brings of big chunk of change to bring fed that down with the subsidies that can be cut. i believe the biofuels and those breaks have gone away. oil is $40 billion. we are proud of the oil drilling with the natural gas extraction we still need the subsidy. together that is $100 billion in 10 years. th
and vote against the president? take a look at a place like oklahoma where energy state and you're supposed of conservatives are coming out in droves to vote against president obama. turnout looks to be down more than 5% and appears with almost all votes counted in oakland. a couple of wrong assumptions we made the overall this is a watershed election because with 84 house freshman in my count, 40 and democrats and 35 election. when you combine that with a few surviving members of the class of 2010, that's 166 members, more than one-third of the house will have less than three years of experience in congress takes office in january. so a huge new freshman class, very steep learning curve, and get ready for the fireworks. >> curtis. and again, you have, many of you have history port and the bbc's report on voter turnout. but tell us what happened and why spent the first and want to do is think dpc, and eric larson for making this report possible. wouldn't have been without them. i'm usually the chicken little of the analyst industry on the turnout, this time i was chicken little when it turn
papers, vigor. the document energy, dispatch, secrecy, someone who could respond to a crisis at the time when there is a crisis, the constitution -- the articles of the federation meant there was a lot of debate, but nobody really to take charge. so they knew they knew they needed both, but they were also very concerned that the separation of power. a think it's fair to say that in the course of the 225 years since then, since that kind of invented or perhaps improvised the presidency is a better word, that there is the nature mentis change in the office. obviously, every president from washington on has taken certain powers for himself. sometimes congress has resisted. the pendulum has swung back and forth if we could go down the list. executive order, signing statements, the war powers. all of these things were fought far beyond what most of the founders would have been vision. but that is the way that democracy and the republic had evolved over these 225 years. >> host: kenneth davis, in your career, have you ever been a teacher at all? >> guest: no, i haven't. somebody called the pro
years we've seen a dramatic increase in sale of energy drinks in america, common fixtures in grocery stores, gas station, convenience stores, everywhere you turn. they target young people. the flashy ads and names like monster and rock star and with claims to increase attention, stamina and even to help with weight loss. according to one study, 30% to 50% of adolescents, teenagers, consume energy drinks. sadly, as the sale of energy drinks has grown, so has the alarming evidence that these energy drinks pose a potential threat to our nation's health. yesterday "the new york times" featured an article that found that the food and drug administration has received 13 adverse event reports for people who died -- who died -- after consuming 5-hour energy drinks. just last month news reports found that five people died -- five -- after consuming monster energy drinks. this last may i met the mother and family of a 14-year-old, anise fournier from maryland. this lovely young teenager lost her life last december when she went into cardiac arrest caused by caffeine toxicity after she tkrafrpb
energy. we need to renew that production tax credit. it's encouraged billions of dollars in investment and helped create tens of thousands of good-paying moobs across our country -- american jobs across our country. but i have to tell your our inaction here is jeopardizing the future of what's really a promising industry. we've literally over the last months seen wind industry jobs in the thousands disappear. that's not a statistic, not just a statement, those jobs affected real americans. and these job losses were completely preventible. and it's time for us to get back to work and extend the production tax credit so that our wind energy industry can also get back to work. and one of the things i've done, mr. president, i've come to the floor some 20-plus times, is focus on an individual state. i want today talk about a state that has incredible potential for wind power. and that's montana. the last best place as montanans like to describe their amazing state. and like almost every state in the country, montana's seen the jobs, clean energy and economic benefits of wind power. i want
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